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    • by Melody Quintana on 08/06/2010 10:55am

      The following is part of our series, Facebook Tips, which answers some of the most commonly asked questions about using Facebook. While we hope these tips are informative, we are unable to answer individual questions on this blog. Visit the Help Center for more information about any topics we cover.


      ...


      Last time I checked, I had 845 Facebook friends. That's a lot of people with news to share, but Facebook's home page can organize these stories for me into two easy-to-follow views of my News Feed—a summary of some of the top stories called "Top News" and a live feed of all stories called "Most Recent." Here's how the two views work:



      Top News

      If you haven't logged onto Facebook in a while, your home page will default to this view.


      Top News shows popular stories from your favorite friends and Pages, many of which have gained lots of attention since the last time you checked. In this view, you might find out about an old friend becoming engaged or see a hilarious video that your sister posted and that tons of your friends liked.


      Since Top News is based on an algorithm, it uses factors such as how many friends are commenting on a post to aggregate content that you'll find interesting. It displays stories based on their relevance, rather than in chronological order.



      Most Recent

      Switch over to the Most Recent view to see all updates from your friends. This view of News Feed also constantly refreshes itself so that you can catch the latest updates.


      You might score a free treat by stumbling on a daily update from Sprinkles Cupcakes, meet up with a friend who posts an update about getting lunch at your favorite deli right now or be the first to find out that U2 concert tickets are on sale. Many of these are stories that you may not have seen in Top News.


      The Most Recent view shows updates from as many as 250 friends and Facebook Pages. If you have more connections, you can adjust the number to have more friends and Pages appear in Most Recent by clicking "Edit Options" at the bottom of your News Feed.


      Don't forget: If there's ever a person, Page or story type that you don't care to see in either of your feeds, you can prevent them from appearing in your News Feed by hovering over the story and clicking the "Hide" button that shows up to the right. If you want to unhide them, click "Edit Options" at the bottom of your News Feed and choose the friends or Pages you want to see updates from again.



      Between your Top News and Most Recent feeds, you'll always be in the loop about news from your friends that matters the most to you.


      Update: We've made improvements on how you can sort your News Feed, including adjustments to "Top Stories" and "Most Recent" views. Visit our Help Center to learn more about how this feature works today.


      Melody Quintana, a specialist on Facebook's user operations team, saw a photo of her newborn cousin for the first time in her Top News.



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    • by Chris Cox on 08/23/2011 11:00am

      UPDATE on December 12, 2012:  We've updated our controls for managing your content. Learn more here

       

       

      ...

      Today we're announcing a bunch of improvements that make it easier to share posts, photos, tags and other content with exactly the people you want. You have told us that "who can see this?" could be clearer across Facebook, so we have made changes to make this more visual and straightforward. The main change is moving most of your controls from a settings page to being inline, right next to the posts, photos and tags they affect. Plus there are several other updates here that will make it easier to understand who can see your stuff (or your friends') in any context. Here's what's coming up, organized around two areas: what shows up on your profile, and what happens when you share something new.

       

      On Your Profile

       

      Your profile should feel like your home on the web - you should never feel like stuff appears there that you don't want, and you should never wonder who sees what's there. The profile is getting some new tools that give you clearer, more consistent controls over how photos and posts get added to it, and who can see everything that lives there.

       

      Inline Profile Controls

       

      Before: Most of the settings for stuff on your profile were a few clicks away on a series of settings pages.

       

      Going Forward: Content on your profile, from your hometown to your latest photo album, will appear next to an icon and a drop-down menu. This inline menu lets you know who can see this part of your profile, and you can change it with one click.

       

       

      A side benefit of moving most settings to inline controls is a much shorter and simpler Settings page.  A bunch of settings that were there previously have been moved directly inline, and a handful have been replaced or removed. (You can find more detail on the profile settings here: http://www.facebook.com/about/control)

       

      Profile Tag Review

       

      Before: Photos you were tagged in would show up on your profile as soon as you were tagged. One of the top requests we've heard is for the ability to approve these tags before they show up on your profile.

       

      Going Forward: You can choose to use the new tool to approve or reject any photo or post you are tagged in before it's visible to anyone else on your profile.

       

       

      Content Tag Review

       

      Before: Anyone who could see your photos or posts could add tags to them.

       

      Going Forward: You have the option to review and approve or reject any tag someone tries to add to your photos and posts.

       

       

      View Profile As…

       

      Before: We heard you wanted to know what your profile looked like to others, but the tool for doing this was behind the scenes.

       

      Going Forward: This tool is now on the top of your profile where it's easier to access.

       

       

       

      When You Share

       

      In addition to the profile changes, it will now be more visually straightforward to understand and control who can see your posts at the time you share them. We're also broadening the functionality of the sharing tool: now if you want to make your posts more expressive, we've made it simple to add location and tag the people you're with.

       

      Inline controls

       

      Before: Controls for who could see your stuff on Facebook lived on a settings page a few clicks away.

       

      Going Forward: The control for who can see each post will be right inline. For each audience, there is now an icon and label to help make it easier to understand and decide who you're sharing with. Also, when you tag someone, the audience label will automatically update to show that the person tagged and their friends can see the post.

       

       

      This dropdown menu will be expanding over time to include smaller groups of people you may want to share with, like co-workers, Friend Lists you've created, and Groups you're a member of. These will make it easy to quickly select exactly the audience you want for any post.

       

      If you're posting to Facebook from a phone or app that does not yet support inline controls, your setting will be the same as it is today. You can change this with a new setting available on your privacy settings page. (For a guided tour of these new controls, go here: http://www.facebook.com/about/sharing)

       

      Word Change: "Everyone" to "Public"

       

      Before: You had the option to share a post with Everyone, which meant that anyone on the internet might be able to see it.

       

      Going Forward: We are changing the name of this label from Everyone to Public so that the control is more descriptive of the behavior: anyone may see it, but not everyone will see it. This is just to make the setting more clear, and it's just a language change.

       

      Change Your Mind After You Post?

       

      Before: Once you posted a status update, you couldn't change who could see it.

       

      Going Forward: Now you'll be able to change who can see any post after the fact. If you accidentally posted something to the wrong group, or changed your mind, you can adjust it with the inline control at any time.

       

      Tag Who You're With, or What You Want to Talk About

       

      Before: You could only tag someone if you were friends with them, and you could only tag a Page if you had liked it. This felt broken or awkward if you had a photo album of co-workers and had to become Facebook friends to tag them in the photos.

       

      Going Forward: You can add tags of your friends or anyone else on Facebook. If you are ever tagged by a non-friend, it won't appear on your profile unless you review and approve the post.

       

      Tag Locations in Posts

       

      Before: You could only "check in" to locations using the Places feature on a smart phone.

       

      Going Forward: Now you can add location to anything. Lots of people use Facebook to talk about where they are, have been or want to go. Now you can add location from anywhere, regardless of what device you are using, or whether it is a status update, photo or Wall post. Of course, you can always choose not to add location at all.

       

       

      As a part of this, we are phasing out the mobile-only Places feature. Settings associated with it are also being phased out or removed. (You can read more about how location works and settings affected here: http://www.facebook.com/about/location)

       

      Remove Tags or Content from Facebook

       

      Before: When we asked, people had different ideas of what removing a tag actually did, and different motivations for wanting to remove them.

       

      Going Forward: Your options for removing tags or content on Facebook are presented more clearly. Your options are: removing from your profile, removing the tag itself, messaging the photo owner or tagger, and requesting the content get taken down. (More details on tagging can be found here: http://www.facebook.com/about/tagging)

       

       

      These changes will start to roll out in the coming days. When they reach you, you'll see a prompt for a tour that walks you through these new features from your homepage. In the meantime, you can read more about the upcoming changes from the links throughout this post. We'll look forward to your feedback on all of this.

       

      Taken together, we hope these new tools make it easier to share with exactly who you want, and that the resulting experience is a lot clearer and a lot more fun.

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    • by Paul McDonald on 12/15/2011 4:30am

      UPDATE on Tuesday, January 24th, 2012: 

      Last year we introduced timeline, a new kind of profile that lets you highlight the photos, posts and life events that help you tell your story. Over the next few weeks, everyone will get timeline. When you get timeline, you'll have 7 days to preview what's there now. This gives you a chance to add or hide whatever you want before anyone else sees it. 

       

      ...

      You can learn more about these new features by taking the quick tour available at the top of your timeline. If you want to get timeline now, go to the Introducing Timeline page and click "Get Timeline." Or you can wait until you see an announcement at the top of your home page.

       

      Orginially published on Thursday, December 15th, 2011: We recently announced our plans to introduce Facebook Timeline, an entirely new kind of profile.

       

      Timeline gives you an easy way to rediscover the things you shared, and collect your most important moments. It also lets you share new experiences, like the music you listen to or the miles you run.

       

      Starting today, timeline is now available everywhere. Here are some tips to help you get started.

       

       

      7-day preview period

       

      When you upgrade to timeline, you'll have seven days to review everything that appears on your timeline before anyone else can see it. You can also choose to publish your timeline at any time during the review period. If you decide to wait, your timeline will go live automatically after seven days. Your new timeline will replace your profile, but all your stories and photos will still be there.

       

      If you want to see how your timeline appears to other people, click the gear menu at the top of your timeline, and select "View As." You can choose to see how your timeline appears to a specific friend or the public.

       

       

       

      Feature or hide stories

       

      As you explore your timeline, you may see stories that you want to feature, like your graduation or the day you bought your first car. There might also be stuff that you want to remove or hide from your timeline.

       

      To feature something on your timeline, roll over the story and click the star to expand it to two columns. Or you can click the pencil to hide, delete or edit a post.

       

       

      Use the privacy dropdown to adjust who can see any of your posts. You can even select "Only Me" for posts you want to keep but don't want others to see.

       

       

      See all your activity

       

      With timeline, now you have access to a new tool called Activity Log. Your activity log is a place where you can review all your posts and activity, from today back to when you first started using Facebook. Only you can see your activity log.

       

      You'll see two dropdown menus next to each story in your activity log. The first lets you see and adjust the privacy of a post. The second lets you decide if you want the post to appear on your timeline. You can feature, hide or delete any of your posts.

       

      To quickly find a certain type of story, click the "All" dropdown at the top of your activity log and select what you're looking for. For example, you can choose to see only photos or posts from apps.

       

       

      Get timeline today

       

      To get timeline, simply go to the Introducing Timeline page and click "Get Timeline." Or you can wait until you see an announcement at the top of your profile.

       

      Starting today, timeline will also be available on Android and m.facebook.com.

       

      We hope you enjoy exploring what's on your timeline, and adding new stories and experiences. We'll be continuing to improve timeline over the next few months. If you have any feedback, please let us know.

       

      Paul, an engineering manager on the Timeline team, is excited to feature his story about getting engaged.

       


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    • by Carl Sjogreen on 01/18/2012 5:26pm

      New timeline apps are now available from Foodspotting, Foodily, Ticketmaster, Pinterest, Rotten Tomatoes, Pose, Kobo, Gogobot, TripAdvisor, and others.  You can now enhance your timeline with apps that help you tell your story, whether you love to cook, eat, travel, run, or review movies.

       

      Apps bring your timeline to life

      ...

      Once you've added an app, you can begin updating your timeline with your activities as they happen. For example, if you love design, shopping or fashion, you can add the Pinterest or Pose apps to make your favorite items part of your timeline.

       

       

      If you love to cook, you can add the Foodily app to your timeline and share your latest dishes. If your friends have added the Foodily app, you can discover new recipes with each other, as you'll see their updates in the ticker and their timeline, and possibly News Feed.

       

      If you're a traveler, you can add the Gogobot and TripAdvisor apps to bring a virtual passport to your timeline, and show your friends where you've been and share tips about your favorite spots from around the world.

       

      Soon, there will be apps for all types of interests, as more apps will launch over time. Whether you love snowboarding, gardening, hiking, or knitting, or something else, there will be an app for you.

       

       

      How to add apps to your timeline

      Timeline apps are for the activities you want to share with friends. You choose when to add an app, and you decide who can see it. After you've added an app, you can always remove posts directly from timeline, and you can also edit your settings from your personal Activity Log.

       

       

      You and your friends can start adding apps to your timeline today to discover new recipes, places to go, events to attend, and more.

       

      Carl Sjogreen, director of platform, can't wait to add more apps to his timeline.

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    • by Alexandre Roche on 01/12/2012 10:00am

      Music is one of the most powerful and fun ways to connect. Whether it's at a concert with a bunch of people or on a long car ride with your best buddy, we love listening to music with our friends. But what if you could listen to music with your friends when you're alone, like at work, at home or on the go?

       

      Today, with music services on Facebook, there's a new way to listen with friends. This feature lets you listen along with any of your friends who are currently listening to music. You can also listen together in a group while one of your... friends plays DJ.  

       

      You can listen to the same song, at the exact same time—so when your favorite vocal part comes in you can experience it together, just like when you're jamming out at a performance or dance club.

       

      How It Works

       

      Look for the music note in the chat sidebar to see which of your friends are listening to music. To listen with a friend, hover over their name, and click the Listen With button. The music will play through the service your friend is using.

       

      When a new song plays, you'll come along for the ride, discovering new music while your friend DJs for you.

       

       

      You'll also have the option to chat about what you're listening to.  As other people start listening along, they'll join the party in a group chat.

       

       

      You can control who you're listening along with through your settings. Learn more here.

       

      Rollout Starts Today

       

      Now, you can experience enjoying music together with your friends no matter where you are. This feature will start rolling out over the next few weeks. We hope you enjoy listening with friends!

       

      Alexandre Roche, a Product Designer at Facebook, is listening to "Stop Your Hate" by Maceo Plex - with Lincoln Hochberg and 2 others.

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    • by Mick Johnson on 12/15/2011 10:00am

      UPDATE on Sunday, December 18th 2011: We're excited to announce that timeline is now available on Facebook for iOS version 4.1, for iPhone and iPod Touch devices.

       

      Originally Published on Thursday, December 15, 2011: Timeline gives you an easy way to see the things you've shared, and collect all your best moments in a single place. In addition to making timeline available on the web , today we're also launching timeline on Android and m.facebook.com.

      ...

       

                        

      Mobile timeline starts with your unique cover photo. As you scroll down, you'll see your posts, photos and life events as they happened, back to the day you were born. Photo albums and other posts are horizontally swipeable, so you can quickly view multiple photos or posts inline without leaving timeline. You can also swipe through the views at the top of your timeline to navigate to your map, photos, subscribers and more.

       

      Making stories more visual

      Your posts now appear in several different ways on your mobile timeline. The photos you share are bigger, and friends you're with and places you visit appear on a map.

       

                       

      Available on m.facebook.com and Android

      Mobile timeline is now available on touch devices using m.facebook.com, and Facebook for Android (version 1.8.1).

       

      To learn more about timeline, visit facebook.com/about/timeline.

       

      Mick Johnson, Facebook product manager, is looking forward to traveling back in time, on his phone.

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    • by Keith Peiris on 12/07/2011 11:30am

      Today we're launching an updated Facebook app for Android. It's now quicker and easier to view photos, get messages and navigate around the app.

       

      Photos get better

      ...

      Photos and albums are up to two times faster than the previous Android app. It's also easier to share photos, view comments and edit captions on the go.

       

       

      View photos with tags, comments and likes

       

       

      Messages on top

      Your messages and notifications are now at the top of your screen. You can respond to friends and stay updated without leaving the page you're on.

       

       

      Get notifications and messages at the top of every screen

       

       

      Menu on the side

      You can quickly access your News Feed, Groups, games and apps from the new left-hand menu. The features you use most are now at your fingertips.

       

      Use the left-hand menu to get around

       

       

      Get the App

      Facebook for Android is available on Android Market.  We're excited about the new app, and we hope you check it out.


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    • by Jonathan Chang on 12/06/2011 9:01pm

      Each year, millions of people post on Facebook to share what's important to them, discuss world events, or just catch up with friends. With more than 800 million people connected around the globe on Facebook, news about the world's triumphs and tragedies spreads fast.

       

      Memology takes the pulse of this global community by comparing this year's status updates to last year's, unearthing the most popular topics and cultural trends - or memes - emerging on Facebook. Whether it's hmu, lms or tbh, each year brings a new set of three letter acronyms... that go viral.

       

      To see memes for countries around the world, along with top trending musicians, actors and songs on Facebook, check out the special tab on the Facebook Page.

       

      Top Global Topics on Facebook

       

      The year's biggest sports event came in February, when the Green Bay Packers defeated the Pittsburgh Steelers to win Super Bowl XLV. Not surprisingly, Packers fans were particularly active around each post-season match (represented by the spikes on the chart), culminating in their victory on February 6.

       

      Charlie Sheen captured people's attention in March, when his trademark "winning," "tiger blood" and "goddesses" memes took off.

       

      Later that month, the United Nations military operations started in Libya, prompting a surge in status updates mentioning "Libya" and "Gaddafi."

       

      The marriage of Kate Middleton and Prince William dominated the conversation in April, with mentions of the phrase "Royal Wedding" shooting up nearly 600-fold in the days running up to their wedding day.

       

      Days later, the death of Osama bin Laden became the most talked about event on Facebook for 2011. On May 1, almost 10 percent of all status updates in English mentioned news of his death.

       

      A couple months later, talk of the trial of Casey Anthony, a Florida woman who was accused of murdering her daughter Caylee Anthony, reached fever pitch. Status updates mentioning Caylee Anthony peaked on July 5, the day her mother was acquitted.

       

      In August, Hurricane Irene struck the east coast of the United States, with people taking to Facebook to get the latest emergency warnings and to make sure their friends and family were safe.

       

       

      The year was also marked by outpourings of sadness and memories after the deaths of Amy Winehouse in July and Steve Jobs in October.

       

      Finally, the launch of the video game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 (mw3) was the big event of November, marking the biggest entertainment launch of all time.

       

       

      Memes for 2011

       

      As well as identifying the top ten global topics on Facebook, we also dug through the data to identify the top trending cultural phenomena for the year.

       

      Planking

      Planking was the flash in the pan meme on Facebook for 2011. Status updates mentioning planking, where people lie face down in unusual locations, exploded in May. That happened after Max Key, the son of New Zealand Prime Minister John Key, posted a Facebook photo of himself planking in the family lounge with his father in the background.

       

       

      The fad quickly lost steam, then rebounded in July when celebrities such as Tom Green, Chris Brown and Katy Perry drew more attention to it.  But even they couldn't stem planking's eventual decline.

       

      lms for a tbh

      2011 was also the year of "lms" and "tbh."

       

       

      "lms," short for "like my status" is an invitation to Facebook friends to like something ("lms if u find this funny!")

       

      A new use of "lms" emerged this year as a way to interact with friends on Facebook. "lms and I'll post your best feature" asks friends to like a status and get a response in the comments.  This catapulted "lms" to become the fastest-growing meme of 2011.

       

      "tbh" or "to be honest'' began as a way to add sincerity at the beginning or end of a statement - like "tbh i completely agree with you."

       

      "tbh" soon went viral. Now it's often used in conjunction with "lms" to give honest feedback about friends - the most iconic status update for 2011 was "lms for a tbh. "

       

       

      While the growth of these two acronyms is slowing, they're likely to remain part of the Facebook lexicon in 2012.

       

       

      Skrillex

      2011 was also the rise of music producer Skrillex. Although Skrillex has been around for several years, his 2011 tour, a collaboration with Korn, and record label launch prompted a 76-fold increase in the number of people mentioning him in their status updates on Facebook.

       

       

      Explore the top status trends by country, fastest growing Pages and most popular media of 2011 on the Facebook Page.

       

      Memology 2011 was developed by Data Scientists Jonathan Chang and Eytan Bakshy, who hope you like their statuses in 2012.


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    • by Samuel W. Lessin on 09/22/2011 10:30am

      UPDATE on Tuesday, December 6, 2011: Beginning Timeline Rollout in New Zealand

      We announced Timeline in September and made it available to developers building apps on our platform. Since then, over a million people have signed up for the developer beta to access Timeline. The feedback we've received so far has been invaluable. Starting today, we are making Timeline more widely available as we measure speed and other types of performance. We'll begin by making it available to people in New Zealand and then roll it out more broadly in the near... future.

       

      Originally Published on Thursday, September 22, 2011:

      Since the beginning of Facebook, your profile has been the place where you tell your story. People use it to share everything from the small stuff, like their thoughts on an article, to the most important events of their lives, like the photos of their wedding or the birth of their child.

       

      The evolution of your profile

       

      Back in the early days of Facebook, your profile was pretty basic – just your name, a photo, where you went to school…stuff you'd cover in the first five minutes you met someone.

       

       

      Over time, your profile evolved to better reflect how you actually communicate with your friends. Now you can can share photos of what you did last weekend, and updates about how you feel today.

       

      But since the focus is on the most recent things you posted, more important stuff slips off the page. The photos of your graduation get replaced by updates about what you had for breakfast.

       

      Say you're catching up with an old friend – would you rather find out that they had eggs this morning, or hear about their new dream job?

       

      The way your profile works today, 99% of the stories you share vanish. The only way to find the posts that matter is to click "Older Posts" at the bottom of the page. Again. And again.

       

       

      Imagine if there was an easy way to rediscover the things you shared, and collect all your best moments in a single place.

       

      Introducing timeline – a new kind of profile

       

      With timeline, now you have a home for all the great stories you've already shared. They don't just vanish as you add new stuff.

       

       

      Timeline is wider than your old profile, and it's a lot more visual.  The first thing you'll notice is the giant photo right at the top. This is your cover, and it's completely up to you which of your photos you put here.

       

      As you scroll down past your cover, you'll see your posts, photos and life events as they happened in time. You choose what's featured on your timeline. You can star your favorites to double their size or hide things altogether.

       

      Filling in the blanks

       

      If important parts of your story aren't included on your timeline, you can go back to when they happened and add them.

       

       

      Or go to your private activity log. This is where you'll find everything you shared since you joined Facebook. Click on any post to feature it on your timeline so your friends can see it, too.

       

       

      Add apps to your timeline

       

      Introducing a new kind of social app that lets you show the things you like to do on your timeline – the music you listen to, the recipes you try, the runs you take and more.

       

       

      These apps also help you discover what your friends are up to. You can even join in if you want: play the song they're listening to, or watch the same TV show.

       

      You can start adding some of these new apps today, but timeline won't be available for a few weeks.

       

      When you get your timeline, you can choose to publish it immediately or take a few days to review what's there and add anything that's missing.

       

      Now, you and your friends will finally be able to tell all the different parts of your story – from the small things you do each day to your biggest moments. What will you create? We can't wait to find out.

       

      Sam Lessin, a product manager at Facebook, is looking forward to adding the photo of his elephant-powered wedding to his timeline.

       

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    • by Mark Zuckerberg on 11/29/2011 9:39am

      I founded Facebook on the idea that people want to share and connect with people in their lives, but to do this everyone needs complete control over who they share with at all times.

       

      This idea has been the core of Facebook since day one. When I built the first version of Facebook, almost nobody I knew wanted a public page on the internet. That seemed scary. But as long as they could make their page private, they felt safe sharing with their friends online. Control was key. With Facebook, for the first time, people had the tools they needed to... do this. That's how Facebook became the world's biggest community online.  We made it easy for people to feel comfortable sharing things about their real lives.

       

      We've added many new tools since then: sharing photos, creating groups, commenting on and liking your friends' posts and recently even listening to music or watching videos together. With each new tool, we've added new privacy controls to ensure that you continue to have complete control over who sees everything you share. Because of these tools and controls, most people share many more things today than they did a few years ago.

       

      Overall, I think we have a good history of providing transparency and control over who can see your information.

       

      That said, I'm the first to admit that we've made a bunch of mistakes. In particular, I think that a small number of high profile mistakes, like Beacon four years ago and poor execution as we transitioned our privacy model two years ago, have often overshadowed much of the good work we've done.

       

      I also understand that many people are just naturally skeptical of what it means for hundreds of millions of people to share so much personal information online, especially using any one service.  Even if our record on privacy were perfect, I think many people would still rightfully question how their information was protected. It's important for people to think about this, and not one day goes by when I don't think about what it means for us to be the stewards of this community and their trust.

       

      Facebook has always been committed to being transparent about the information you have stored with us – and we have led the internet in building tools to give people the ability to see and control what they share.  

       

      But we can also always do better. I'm committed to making Facebook the leader in transparency and control around privacy.

       

      As we have grown, we have tried our best to listen closely to the people who use Facebook. We also work with regulators, advocates and experts to inform our privacy practices and policies. Recently, the US Federal Trade Commission established agreements with Google and Twitter that are helping to shape new privacy standards for our industry. Today, the FTC announced a similar agreement with Facebook. These agreements create a framework for how companies should approach privacy in the United States and around the world.

       

      For Facebook, this means we're making a clear and formal long-term commitment to do the things we've always tried to do and planned to keep doing -- giving you tools to control who can see your information and then making sure only those people you intend can see it.

       

      In the last 18 months alone, we've announced more than 20 new tools and resources designed to give you more control over your Facebook experience. Some of the things these include are:

       

      • An easier way to select your audience when making a new post

      Inline privacy controls on all your existing posts

      • The ability to review tags made by others before they appear on your profile

      Friend lists that are easier to create and that maintain themselves automatically

      • A new groups product for sharing with smaller sets of people

      • A tool to view your profile as someone else would see it

      • Tools to ensure your information stays secure like double login approval

      Mobile versions of your privacy controls

      • An easy way to download all your Facebook data

      • A new apps dashboard to control what your apps can access

      • A new app permission dialog that gives you clear control over what an app can do anytime you add one

      • Many more privacy education resources

       

      As a matter of fact, privacy is so deeply embedded in all of the development we do that every day tens of thousands of servers worth of computational resources are consumed checking to make sure that on any webpage we serve, that you have access to see each of the sometimes hundreds or even thousands of individual pieces of information that come together to form a Facebook page. This includes everything from every post on a page to every tag in those posts to every mutual friend shown when you hover over a person's name. We do privacy access checks literally tens of billions of times each day to ensure we're enforcing that only the people you want see your content. These privacy principles are written very deeply into our code.

       

      Even before the agreement announced by the FTC today, Facebook had already proactively addressed many of the concerns the FTC raised. For example, their complaint to us mentioned our Verified Apps Program, which we canceled almost two years ago in December 2009. The same complaint also mentions cases where advertisers inadvertently received the ID numbers of some users in referrer URLs. We fixed that problem over a year ago in May 2010.

       

      In addition to these product changes, the FTC also recommended improvements to our internal processes. We've embraced these ideas, too, by agreeing to improve and formalize the way we do privacy review as part of our ongoing product development process. As part of this, we will establish a biennial independent audit of our privacy practices to ensure we're living up to the commitments we make.

       

      Even further, effective today I am creating two new corporate officer roles to make sure our commitments will be reflected in what we do internally -- in the development of our products and the security of our systems -- and externally -- in the way we work collaboratively with regulators, government agencies and privacy groups from around the world:

       

      - Erin Egan will become Chief Privacy Officer, Policy. Erin recently joined Facebook after serving as a partner and co-chair of the global privacy and data security practice of Covington & Burling, the respected international law firm. Throughout her career, Erin has been deeply involved in legislative and regulatory efforts to address privacy, data security, spam, spyware and other consumer protection issues. Erin will lead our engagement in the global public discourse and debate about online privacy and ensure that feedback from regulators, legislators, experts and academics from around the world is incorporated into Facebook's practices and policies.

       

      - Michael Richter will become Chief Privacy Officer, Products. Michael is currently Facebook's Chief Privacy Counsel on our legal team. In his new role, Michael will join our product organization to expand, improve and formalize our existing program of internal privacy review. He and his team will work to ensure that our principles of user control, privacy by design and transparency are integrated consistently into both Facebook's product development process and our products themselves.

       

      These two positions will further strengthen the processes that ensure that privacy control is built into our products and policies. I'm proud to have two such strong individuals with so much privacy expertise serving in these roles.

       

      Today's announcement formalizes our commitment to providing you with control over your privacy and sharing -- and it also provides protection to ensure that your information is only shared in the way you intend. As the founder and CEO of Facebook, I look forward to working with the Commission as we implement this agreement. It is my hope that this agreement makes it clear that Facebook is the leader when it comes to offering people control over the information they share online.

       

      Finally, I also want to reaffirm the commitment I made when I first launched Facebook. We will serve you as best we can and work every day to provide you with the best tools for you to share with each other and the world. We will continue to improve the service, build new ways for you to share and offer new ways to protect you and your information better than any other company in the world.

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